Swim Strokes

This interactive simulation is an introduction to identifying Resting Swim Strokes versus Competitive Swim Strokes. In addition, this simulation allows you to compare and match the upper body and lower body motion for each stroke presented. The ultimate learning goal is to provide you with a level of foundational knowledge to increase your confidence and comfort level before you enter the water.

This interactive learning activity will help you to:

  • Categorize, compare, recognize, and contrast between Resting Swim Strokes and Competitive Swim Strokes.
  • Identify, choose, match, and recall the proper upper torso and lower torso motions for the following Resting Swim Strokes:
    1. Elementary Backstroke
    2. Sidestroke
  • Identify, choose, match, and recall the proper upper torso and lower torso motions for the following Competitive Swim Strokes:
    1. Front Crawl (aka freestyle or free)
    2. Back Crawl (aka backstroke or back)
    3. Breaststroke (aka breast)
    4. Butterfly (aka fly)

blue color swatch Swimmer's Left Arm and Leg

green color swatch Swimmer's Right Arm and Leg

Resting Strokes

Select the upper and lower motions for the Resting Strokes.

Competitive Strokes

Select the upper and lower motions for the Competitive Strokes.

Information

RoseAnn A'Jontue

RoseAnn A'Jontue is a lecturer in the Kinesiology and Health Promotion Department at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona where she incorporates technology-enhanced design into her activity and lecture courses. She is also a certified PADI Scuba Instructor, certified lifeguard, certified Water Safety Instructor, and Certified Pool Operator.

Bo Choi

Bo Choi is an instructional designer for eLearning at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. She provides instructional design to assist faculty in redesigning existing courses or developing new courses for online, hybrid and web-assisted modes of instruction.

Richard Feldman

Richard Feldman is a multimedia developer for eLearning at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. He creates interactive simulations that help faculty demonstrate concepts that are otherwise difficult to explain to students.

Richard previously spent 9 years working as a swim instructor and coach. This simulation is based on an earlier learning object which he created for a graduate school project.

Other Credits: Unless otherwise specified, all images, graphics, and content in this simulation are property of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.